Posts Tagged ‘Warner Brothers Records’


Tusk (album)

Image via Wikipedia

Fleetwood Mac is one of those bands that’s timeless: they have a tendency to stay relevant regardless of the time period, yet somehow stay true to their musical roots. However, they are a little prone to experimentation, which can be somewhat of a hit or miss.

Tusk is one of those albums where Lindsey and co. do exactly that. At times, such songs as The Ledge sound great, but lyrically sound like a veiled reference to all the fights that led to the demise of the romantic relationship between band members Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham – who wrote the song. If it is meant to invoke the insanity of their breakup, well Lindsey captured it very well. Other songs such as I Know I’m Not Wrong, sound a bit reminiscent of their previous album, Rumours, but with a bit of a nice kick.

What Makes You Think You’re The One shows the overall strong musicianship of original member, drummer Mick Fleetwood.

However, there are some major misses with this album, such as That’s All For Everyone. The song drowns in mediocrity – something very uncharacteristic when it comes to the creativity of Lindsey Buckingham. Even worse, on both this song and Not That Funny you can barely decipher what Buckingham is actually saying.

One of the major hit and misses with Tusk is some of Stevie’s contributions. On one hand, you have Sara, which is very beautiful track. Sara was written about Stevie’s then-best friend Sara Recor, whom Mick Fleetwood (who Stevie was dating at the time) fell in love with and eventually married and divorced her. One must wonder though, considering the circumstances, is this meant as sarcasm to her or just a nice song to a close friend? One of her better songs is Angel, which sounds more like the familiar Fleetwood Mac sound, albeit with a rather interesting bass line provided by John McVie.

However, keyboardist Christine McVie almost steals the album with her contribution of the hauntingly beautiful Brown Eyes. The track itself is reminiscent of both the Doors and Led Zepplin. McVie is the true balladeer of Fleetwood Mac. She proves this on the following track as well: Never Make Me Cry.

The best thing about Tusk is the title track. The band goes all out – complete with the USC Trojan Marching Band. The track has an overal stalker-like tone when Buckingham whispers the lyrics, then Mcvie and Nicks break in with him with the rallying cry of “Don’t say that you love me/ just tell me that you want me/ TUSK!”

Unfortunately, when it was released, it wasn’t the massive hit that Rumours was for many reasons: since it was a double album, it cost consumers $15.98 which was a steep price to pay for an album released in 1979. Another nail in the album coffin was the fact that the RKO radio chain played Tusk in its entirety shortly before the album was released and many listeners possibly recorded the album off the radio. Additionally, the album itself cost over $1 million to make.

Overall Tusk is the equivalent of a musical rollercoaster ride with an ongoing soap opera element. You never know where it will go next.

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Very few albums, or artists for that matter, have served as a soundtrack to a generation. Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours does exactly that. It’s still is a relevant album because it explores in a voyeuristic way, the personal turmoil amongst the band members during the recording of the album. The mix of personal turmoil amongst the band, though it nearly cost them their sanity and was fueled by lots and lots of drugs, make this a beautiful masterpiece.

Best of all, it is easy to relate to lyrically due to its content –  which includes jabs at other band members, all of whom were experiencing romantic turmoil: bassist John McVie and his wife Christine’s marriage was in shambles as was the romantic relationship between singer Stevie Nicks and guitarist Lindsey Buckingham. Additionally, Nicks and drummer Mick Fleetwood (who was married at the time) were having an affair.

Songs like Don’t Stop and Songbird which are nothing short of an offer of hope both personally and for the band itself. Perhaps they were thinking in they lyric from The Chain: “I can still hear you saying you would never break the chain.” It is one of the few songs that is written by the ENTIRE band and it is a gem.

Also, one of the other great things is the actual skill of the musicians. One of the best sounding tracks on the album is You Make Lovin’ Fun. Lead vocalist [for this track] and keyboard player Christine McVie is remarkable on all accounts. However, all of the lyrical greatness and great sound come together on Gold Dust Woman – which is both a metaphor for drugs and quite possibly the ending of the relationship of the songs author, Stevie Nicks, and then-boyfriend Lindsey Buckingham.

For those of you that saw last week’s episode of Glee, this is an album worth buying due to the fact that it is great musicianship under fire, something that happens to us all. It is very relatable if you have ever endured a never-ending breakup. That is what makes this album one of the greatest albums.

Also be sure to check out the special Classic Albums that VH1 Classic and the BBC documentary they did on Rumours, where they go into both the technicality of making the album as well as what the songs are about – including stories and interviews with band members and album personnel.


Tusk (album)

Image via Wikipedia

Fleetwood Mac is one of those bands that’s timeless: they have a tendency to stay relevant regardless of the time period, yet somehow stay true to their musical roots. However, they are a little prone to experimentation, which can be somewhat of a hit or miss.

Tusk is one of those albums where Lindsey and co. do exactly that. At times, such songs as The Ledge sound great, but lyrically sound like a veiled reference to all the fights that led to the demise of the romantic relationship between band members Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham – who wrote the song. If it is meant to invoke the insanity of their breakup, well Lindsey captured it very well. Other songs such as I Know I’m Not Wrong, sound a bit reminiscent of their previous album, Rumours, but with a bit of a nice kick.

What Makes You Think You’re The One shows the overall strong musicianship of original member, drummer Mick Fleetwood.

However, there are some major misses with this album, such as That’s All For Everyone. The song drowns in mediocrity – something very uncharacteristic when it comes to the creativity of Lindsey Buckingham. Even worse, on both this song and Not That Funny you can barely decipher what Buckingham is actually saying.

One of the major hit and misses with Tusk is some of Stevie’s contributions. On one hand, you have Sara, which is very beautiful track. Sara was written about Stevie’s then-best friend Sara Recor, whom Mick Fleetwood (who Stevie was dating at the time) fell in love with and eventually married and divorced her. One must wonder though, considering the circumstances, is this meant as sarcasm to her or just a nice song to a close friend? One of her better songs is Angel, which sounds more like the familiar Fleetwood Mac sound, albeit with a rather interesting bass line provided by John McVie.

However, keyboardist Christine McVie almost steals the album with her contribution of the hauntingly beautiful Brown Eyes. The track itself is reminiscent of both the Doors and Led Zepplin. McVie is the true balladeer of Fleetwood Mac. She proves this on the following track as well: Never Make Me Cry.

The best thing about Tusk is the title track. The band goes all out – complete with the USC Trojan Marching Band. The track has an overal stalker-like tone when Buckingham whispers the lyrics, then Mcvie and Nicks break in with him with the rallying cry of “Don’t say that you love me/ just tell me that you want me/ TUSK!”

Unfortunately, when it was released, it wasn’t the massive hit that Rumours was for many reasons: since it was a double album, it cost consumers $15.98 which was a steep price to pay for an album released in 1979. Another nail in the album coffin was the fact that the RKO radio chain played Tusk in its entirety shortly before the album was released and many listeners possibly recorded the album off the radio. Additionally, the album itself cost over $1 million to make.

Overall Tusk is the equivalent of a musical rollercoaster ride with an ongoing soap opera element. You never know where it will go next.


Blondes Have More Fun

Image via Wikipedia

Rod Stewart is one of those artists that is very chameleon-like and kinda timeless: no matter what decade or genre, he can do it. He’s done punk with his former band, the Faces, disco with Do Ya Think I’m Sexy, straight-up rock with She Won’t Dance With Me, synthpop and new wave with Young Turks and finally aspects of the Great American Songbook.

On his 1974 release, Blondes Have More Fun, Rod Stewart decides to start out the album with a sexy party with the disco-tinged come-on  Do Ya Think I’m Sexy. One of the greatest things about this song is that it sounds like its song title. Best of all, like most of Stewart’s songs, it is written as a narrative – almost like he was watching as an observer. But this changes when it comes to the infamous chorus “If you want my body and you think I’m sexy/ Come on, sugar, let me know/ If you really need me just reach out and touch me/ Come on, honey, tell me so.” Stewart is clearly talking about himself.
Other songs like Dirty Weekend are kinda, well, dirty. The word “pussy” does not fit the song – it’s straight up inappropriate.  The album further falls on its face with Last Summer. It sounds like he is trying to recreate a slower version of his classic Maggie May. It’s an epic fail on his behalf.

However, the absolute best song is the title track – a straight up rock song that proves to Stewart’s critics that he still a rock & roller in his heart. He even fuses disco and rock together with Standing in the Shadows of Love – which sound great no thanks to legendary drummer Carmine Appice and bassist Phillip Chen.

Overall, this album isn’t worth buying, however some of the good tracks like the title track, Do Ya Think I’m Sexy and Standing In the Shadows of Love are worth downloading.


Ahhhh Fleetwood Mac. A band where you know who dated who and who broke up with who. However, when they make music together, it’s completely sheer magic. On Tango In the Night, this magic once again doesn’t fail them.

On this album, the band members take a more stylized production approach – a slick pop approach that still stays true to the style and music of Fleetwood Mac. Mirage and Rumours were more organic in both their sound and lyrics. Tango In the Night is, but with more production overdubs and a more pop approach. It sounds like they took more production cues from their most popular band member, Stevie Nicks, whose latest solo release at the time was Rock A Little (1985)

The greatest thing about this album is that there is no weak track. Each is a great standalone track. But perhaps one of the greatest tracks is Big Love due to the creative guitar-playing and “love grunting” of guitarist Lindsey Buckingham.

One thing to notice about the album is that the presence of Stevie Nicks is a little less. While she sings backup on many of the songs such as Little Lies, she has less songs where she is the lead vocalist, or even the main songwriter. The reason is due to the fact that she was in rehab for a cocaine addiction. On the other hand, Seven Wonders, though it’s not Gypsy or Gold Dust Woman, is still a viable (and underrated) classic. One surprise great track is Welcome to the Room…..Sara. It almost is a foreshadow of her later work including her latest single Secret Love from her latest album In Your Dreams.

Overall this is one of the most under appreciated albums of Fleetwood Mac. It is definitely a good listen, even though it is a deviation from the normal bluesy-pop/rock that has become beloved among Fleetwood Mac fans.

 


Very few albums, or artists for that matter, have served as a soundtrack to a generation. Fleetwood Mac’s Rumours does exactly that. It’s still is a relevant album because it explores in a voyeuristic way, the personal turmoil amongst the band members during the recording of the album. The mix of personal turmoil amongst the band, though it nearly cost them their sanity and was fueled by lots and lots of drugs, make this a beautiful masterpiece.

Best of all, it is easy to relate to lyrically due to its content –  which includes jabs at other band members, all of whom were experiencing romantic turmoil: bassist John McVie and his wife Christine’s marriage was in shambles as was the romantic relationship between singer Stevie Nicks and guitarist Lindsey Buckingham. Additionally, Nicks and drummer Mick Fleetwood (who was married at the time) were having an affair.

Songs like Don’t Stop and Songbird which are nothing short of an offer of hope both personally and for the band itself. Perhaps they were thinking in they lyric from The Chain: “I can still hear you saying you would never break the chain.” It is one of the few songs that is written by the ENTIRE band and it is a gem.

Also, one of the other great things is the actual skill of the musicians. One of the best sounding tracks on the album is You Make Lovin’ Fun. Lead vocalist [for this track] and keyboard player Christine McVie is remarkable on all accounts. However, all of the lyrical greatness and great sound come together on Gold Dust Woman – which is both a metaphor for drugs and quite possibly the ending of the relationship of the songs author, Stevie Nicks, and then-boyfriend Lindsey Buckingham.

For those of you that saw last week’s episode of Glee, this is an album worth buying due to the fact that it is great musicianship under fire, something that happens to us all. It is very relatable if you have ever endured a never-ending breakup. That is what makes this album one of the greatest albums.

Also be sure to check out the special Classic Albums that VH1 Classic and the BBC documentary they did on Rumours, where they go into both the technicality of making the album as well as what the songs are about – including stories and interviews with band members and album personnel.