Posts Tagged ‘Modern Records’


Rock music’s Gold Dust Woman is perhaps one of the most visually descriptive artists. Listening to her lyrics is like listening to the likes of great writers such as James Joyce, C.S. Lewis, John Keats, and John Steinbeck. Couple that with the overall sound of Stevie Nicks and you have the American answer to the British Kate Bush – albeit with a lower vocal range and an edgier sound.

Stevie Nicks’ 1989 release The Other Side of the Mirror is a return to the sound that made her a great solo artist. Gone are the cheesy 80’s synthesizers, producer Jimmy Iovine (with whom she had a relationship with sometime during the making of Bella Donna and The Wild Heart) and cocaine that defined her 1985 release Rock A Little. Here, Nicks returns to her roots, but this time takes a bit more of an adult approach. She proves this on Rooms On Fire, which is a more grown-up version of The Wild Heart. Nicks has stated that the song “is about a girl who goes through a life like I have gone through, where she finally accepts the idea that there never will be those other things in her life. She will never be married, she will never have children, she will never do those [that] part of life.”

Many of the tracks are nothing short of beautiful. One prime example of this is her duet with Bruce Hornsby of Bruce Hornsby and the Range on Two Kinds of Love. One of the greatest aspects is the harmonies with both Hornsby, Nicks, and her ever-present backup singers Lori Perry-Nicks and Sharon Celani. However, Nicks returns to the rock sound that we know and love hearing her sing with the down and dirty rocker Whole Lotta Trouble.

Nicks also seems to take slight cues from her peers on Alice – a song about Alice from Alice In Wonderland. (which is the theme of the overall album) However, the overall sound seems a bit inspired by the later works of fellow rocker Pat Benatar. However, there is interesting little surprise on this track: Kenny G on tenor sax.

However, one part does get a little spooky. On Doing The Best I Can (Escape From Berlin) speaks of life after an abusive relationship. But it works well for the album.

This album is probably one of the more underrated gems of Nicks’ career. However it is still worth investing into because this is alot like reading a book at times.

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Stevie Nicks has proven herself to be the most powerful woman in rock & roll. However, even rocks Gold Dust Woman has her “what was she thinking” moments. Rock A Little perhaps is one of these.

Rock A Little is a little like her previous release, the 1983 classic The Wild Heart albeit with a more 80’s pop feel. It fits Nicks much like a fashion accessory – too many of them break the overall outfit. The title track, “Rock A Little (Go Ahead Lily),” is one of those tracks. The lyrics scream rock song or at least a power ballad, but instead it is a slower song. Either way, neither song nor lyric fit each other.

“The Nightmare” is a completely senseless song. Though it has a great beat, it’s like she was on quite a bit of drugs when she recorded it. The same goes for other songs such as “I Sing For Things” – which would be an enjoyable track had Nicks not been on drugs, thus slurring her words. She does this on many of the tracks. Shortly after the Rock A Little tour, she famously entered the Betty Ford Clinic for treatment for a cocaine addiction.

However, “I Can’t Wait” is almost like an updated version of the classic smash “Stand Back.” A surprise track that the Wild Heart loves is “If I Were You” – a ballad that is a plea to a significant other to stay in the relationship. It is a beautiful, yet uptempo, ballad. “Sister Honey” is a rare almost-dance track from Stevie Nicks. It is a great album cut. One of the best album tracks is “Has Anyone Ever Written Anything For You” – a song written for then-boyfriend and member of the Eagles Joe Walsh, who had suffered the loss of his young daughter due to injuries in an automobile accident en route to nursery school in 1974. Walsh took Nicks to the water fountain that she frequented when she was alive to show Nicks that her problems and pain were nothing compared to the hell he has put up with.

Overall the Wild Heart can only recommend this album if either a) you want to show your children what music on drugs sounds like or b) you are a die-heart Stevie Nicks fan. Otherwise, only download a few tracks and nothing more.


As a member of Fleetwood Mac, Stevie Nicks was just one of many contributing voices and songwriters. However she proves that she is much more with the release of Bella Donna.

This album is almost like an extension of her contributions to Fleetwood Mac at least on the title track and Kind of Woman, but she quickly kicks things into gear with a duet, Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around with fellow rocker Tom Petty of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. It is a sign of what is to come on her next album, The Wild Heart. She continues this with the country-tinged Think About It and The Highwayman. 

However, Bella Donna takes flight in the area of sheer amazement with the ever-popular and seminal smash Edge of Seventeen. It is one of the best songs of the album not only because of its driving guitar, but even its meaning. It has a pretty interesting story behind the song. Nevertheless it is a sad story. It is about the death of both ex-Beatle John Lennon and Nicks’ Uncle John, who died around the same time of each other. It is referenced metaphorically throughout the song. Nicks has talked about this many times whenever the subject of this song comes up. It has since become a staple of all her concerts.

On Leather and Lace, former boyfriend and Eagles lead singer Don Henley joins her in a rather beautiful manner. She tells him “I have my own life/ and I am stronger than you know/ But I carry this feeling/ That when you walked into my house/ That you won’t be walking out the door.”

Overall the album still sounds like some of the Fleetwood Mac material, yet Nicks shows that she is capable of having a great solo career outside of the band.


Rock music’s gold dust woman makes a huge splash with her 1983 release, The Wild Heart.

Rocker and Fleetwood Mac member Stevie Nicks shows off her best vocals on her 1983 release "The Wild Heart."

Stevie Nicks is known for having a lush, deep, contra-alto voice. Nicks’ beautiful voice truly shines on such tracks as synthesizer-driven If Anyone Falls. The track only gets better on the chorus, when Nicks is joined by her two backup singers which include die-hard fan favorite band member Lori Perry- Nicks.

However, the best track on this album is the ever-popular Stand Back. Since the album’s release, it has become a staple at both Nicks’ solo shows and Fleetwood Mac concerts. It shows Nicks at her best – complete with vocal prowess.

Nicks also shows what a great songwriter she is on Nothing Ever Changes in which Nicks exclaims “Come back…little boy/ baby come back…yeah…little boy/ Ooh…it’s just me that lies waiting/ Well it could come from anywhere/ oooh it could come straight straight from my heart/ nothing can be saved here.”

The one weakness of this album though is the end trackBeauty and the Beast. To anyone who was born AFTER 1983, do not let this title fool you because it is not inspired by or even talking about the 1992 Disney classic of the same title. She is speaking about the silent film of the same title. It just sounds too slow tempo-wise and doesn’t fit in with the overall album.

Overall the album is comparable to other great artists such as Sheryl Crow and her body of work, who has cited Nicks as an influence and also worked with her. I would recommend this to any fan of independent music because it has a definitive independent feel to it. Overall, it is a great album.