Posts Tagged ‘Jimi Hendrix’


Pat Benatar, live, 2007-09-07

So I have come to the conclusion that, in this life, my 1st few dream concert tours will never happen. What is it you ask? The Beatles with Jimi Hendrix or Big Brother and the Holding Company with Amy Winehouse and Axl Rose. Sadly about 1/3 of these people are dead (John Lennon, George Harrison, Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, and Amy Winehouse) and one is a bit bipolar and LOVES to cause fights.

However, one could happen with lots of wishful thinking: a tour with Heart, Pat Benatarand Stevie Nicks – the queens of rock and

roll! They could call it the Wild Hearts, Lovemongers, and Heartbreakers tour.

Could you imagine what their setlists would be? Here’s what I think it would be:

Pat Benatar

  1. Invincible
  2. You Better Run
  3. In the Heat of the Night (with Stevie Nicks)
  4. Go
  5. Diamond Fields
  6. Treat Me Right
  7. We Live For Love
  8. We Belong (with Nancy Wilson on acoustic guitar)
  9. Anxiety (Get Nervous)
  10. Heartbreaker
  11. Hell is for Children
  12. No You Don’t

Stevie Nicks

  1. Stand Back
  2. Outside the Rain
  3. Gypsy
  4. Secret Love
  5. Ghosts are Gone
  6. Wild Heart (Heart joins her for a duet)
  7. Stop Draggin My Heart Around
  8.  Enchanted
  9. How Still My Love
  10. Talk To Me
  11. No Spoken Word
  12. Edge of Seventeen (Pat Benatar joins her for a duet)

Heart

  1. Wild Child
  2. WTF
  3. Never
  4. Will You Be There (In the Morning)
  5. These Dreams (acoustic version with Nancy on mandolin)
  6. Magic Man
  7. Cook with Fire
  8. Straight On (Pat Benatar joins them onstage for a duet)
  9. Dog and Butterfly (Stevie joins them for a duet)
  10. Immigrant Song (Led Zepplin cover)
  11. Crazy On You
  12.  Barracuda
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One of the coolest things to ever emerge from my generation was none other than the Wonder Years. The reason why is because it was one of the first American television shows that successfully, for my generation, showed what the 60’s and early 70’s were about – abeit with the perspective of a preadolescent kid named Kevin Arnold (played by Fred Savage). He was accompanied by his pal Paul Pheiffer, love interest and later highschool sweetheart Winnie Cooper as well as his family: his brother the bully Wayne, hippie sister Karen and parents Jack and Norma. Jack was a bit conservative much like most fathers were in that time period. Norma was middle-road and sort of a feminist – much in reflection to the Women’s Liberation Movement.

However, there was one thing that made this show hit the ball out of the park: the music. Never had a show truly encorporated the hit songs of the time with such ease. They used songs such as Light My Fire by the Doors, Foxy Lady by Jimi Hendrix, Bob Dylan, Steppenwolf, the list goes on. The soundtrack to that show not only introduced that music to a new generation but also made good scenes between characters great.

The other great thing about The Wonder Years is that it shows that regardless of decade,  the aspects of growing up never change. Young girls will always be chased by the young guys. There will always be teenage rebellion and angst. In the 60’s it was artists like Janis Joplin, Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix as well as Vietnam War protests. My generation gets the horrible events of September 11, 2001, No Doubt, Nirvana, and Jay-Z. Not TOO shabby but still, they aren’t as comparable to those legends.

It wasn’t good television. The Wonder Years was GREAT television.


The Summit later became known as the Compaq Center in the 90's. It's now home to Joel Osteen Ministries, better known as Lakewood Church.

Today I stumbled across an old Stevie Nicks video called Whole Lotta Trouble. I remembered reading about how the concert video was filmed – more specifically its location. It was filmed in Houston, which is the home of the Wild Heart. More specifically, the Summit – the fomer home of the Houston Rockets. As a result, I thought of the 2 concerts that were held there in which I and my parents attended: Handel’s Young Messiah in 1992 and Handel’s Young Messiah Farewell Tour in 1995. Both were major tours within Contemporary Christian music at the time and boasted a “who’s who” of artists at the top of the CCM charts: Steven Curtis Chapman, Twila Paris, Sandi Patti, First Call, Point of Grace, Christian metal band White Heart, the list goes on and on.

The Summit was to performance/sports venues in Houston what Madison Square Garden is to New York City. Though yes, we do have the Toyota Center (which is the current home of the Rockets), but as a music lover who resides in this great town I keep wondering why do we keep getting rid of our historic musical venues? Let me ask you this: what would New York City be without Madison Square Garden? What would Los Angeles be without the Staples Center?

The Sam Houston Coliseum hosted numerous musical legends such as the Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, Van Halen just to name a few.

Unlike San Francisco, Houston has a nasty habit of getting rid of historical buildings: the Sam Houston Coliseum, the Music Hall. Okay maybe they didn’t have landmark status, but considering some of the acts that walked onto their stages: the Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, Paul McCartney just to name a few – these venues deserved that status. However, they are all demolished now or turned into a megachurch. Could we not make the needed changes to these places to cater to Houstonian music lovers? Where there’s a will, there’s a way!

The interior of the Music Hall. Isn't It beautiful?

All we have now is the Toyota Center, Minute Maid Park, Reliant Arena, H-Town Arena Theater, Verizon Wireless Theater, Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavillion, and the House of Blues. Though these are great venues, they somehow don’t measure up to their predecessors. Essentially what we need in Houston is our own version of places like the Fillmore.

The Music Hall in its heydey

 


Cover of "Buckingham Nicks"

In 1973 there was a young couple that resided in Los Angeles that were from the remnants of a band called Fritz – who previously became popular because they opened for the likes of Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, among others in the San Francisco Bay area. Though their band Fritz disbanded, band members Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks secured a record deal with Polydor records.

Though the album flopped and was dropped from Polydor, it served as a springboard for both members musical careers. One day producer Keith Olson was playing Long Distance Winner to Mick Fleetwood, drummer for the popular British then-blues band Fleetwood Mac, who had endured a staggering 9 lineup changes prior to the inclusion of Buckingham Nicks. Originally Mick wanted only Buckingham. However, according to Behind the Music Remastered, Buckingham insisted on his then-girlfriend, Stevie Nicks, come as part of a “package deal.”

Buckingham Nicks’ self-titled debut album is like a beautiful diamond in the rough or even a fine wine: it gets better with age and experience. Nicks voice sounds raw as does Buckingham’s fast guitar picking on Don’t Let Me Down Again which, at one point Nicks seems to slightly scream “Baby baby don’t treat me this way.” One of the more hauntingly beautiful tracks is Races Are Run, which singer Stevie Nicks voice shines. The song itself though, in retrospect kinda foreshadows what would happen to Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham, who famously were one of many of the band members in the throes of a bad breakup during the recording of Fleetwood Mac’s enormously popular Rumours album in 1977. Though they have had their moments, the two are still friends to this day.

However, one of the coolest things about this album is that if it was released today, it would quite possibly be a hit in the indie world. In a perfect world this album would’ve been a hit, they would have gotten married and made more albums like this. But as time went on to successful careers: Stevie as a member of Fleetwood Mac as well as a massively popular solo career and Lindsey Buckingham as an influential guitar player.

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Cover of "Buckingham Nicks"

In 1973 there was a young couple that resided in Los Angeles that were from the remnants of a band called Fritz – who previously became popular because they opened for the likes of Janis Joplin, Jimi Hendrix, among others in the San Francisco Bay area. Though their band Fritz disbanded, band members Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks secured a record deal with Polydor records.

Though the album flopped and was dropped from Polydor, it served as a springboard for both members musical careers. One day producer Keith Olson was playing Long Distance Winner to Mick Fleetwood, drummer for the popular British then-blues band Fleetwood Mac, who had endured a staggering 9 lineup changes prior to the inclusion of Buckingham Nicks. Originally Mick wanted only Buckingham. However, according to Behind the Music Remastered, Buckingham insisted on his then-girlfriend, Stevie Nicks, come as part of a “package deal.”

Buckingham Nicks’ self-titled debut album is like a beautiful diamond in the rough or even a fine wine: it gets better with age and experience. Nicks voice sounds raw as does Buckingham’s fast guitar picking on Don’t Let Me Down Again which, at one point Nicks seems to slightly scream “Baby baby don’t treat me this way.” One of the more hauntingly beautiful tracks is Races Are Run, which singer Stevie Nicks voice shines. The song itself though, in retrospect kinda foreshadows what would happen to Stevie Nicks and Lindsey Buckingham, who famously were one of many of the band members in the throes of a bad breakup during the recording of Fleetwood Mac’s enormously popular Rumours album in 1977. Though they have had their moments, the two are still friends to this day.

However, one of the coolest things about this album is that if it was released today, it would quite possibly be a hit in the indie world. In a perfect world this album would’ve been a hit, they would have gotten married and made more albums like this. But as time went on to successful careers: Stevie as a member of Fleetwood Mac as well as a massively popular solo career and Lindsey Buckingham as an influential guitar player.

A+