Posts Tagged ‘Hit Me With Your Best Shot’


Pat Benatar is one of the best artists to emerge from the MTV era of rock & roll: the 60s-90s. Among such heavyweights as Journey, the lovely ladies of Heart, Fleetwood Mac, and even the Buggles, Benatar holds her own with her powerhouse

Cover of "Live From Earth"

vocals. This what has made her an icon. However, as with all great artists, they are meant to be heard live. Benatar proves she’s worthy of this with her 1983 live album, Live From Earth.

However, with all great artists, they are meant to be heard live and Benatar proves that she’s worthy of the “must-see” concert label.

She opens the show with the haunting classic “Fire and Ice.” However, things get really amazing when she breaks into the gritty “I Want Out” followed by the awesomeness that is “We Live For Love” and the grisly, sad, and controversial “Hell Is For Children.” That track is literally one that leaps out of the speakers and grabs you instantly. Clearly, this is Pat Benatar at her “tough-girl” persona best. One which she would abandon for another persona, a bit more personal one if you will – motherhood, with her 1984 album Tropico. The two studio tracks, the ever-popular “Love Is A Battlefield” and “Lipstick Lies” (both containing very memorable videos – such as Benatar herself doing Michael Jackson-style dance sequences) serve as a great transition into this new era for Benatar.

What Pat Benatar live album would not be complete without her performing her swan song, “Hit Me With Your Best Shot?” None! However, this is probably the weaker track of this album because you can barely hear her vocals. Since the album was recorded in many places, wherever they recorded it, the acoustics are TERRIBLE!

Benatar and her husband Neil Geraldo quickly redeem themselves on “Promises In the Dark.” The live version of “Promises In The Dark” actually sounds better than the recording as heard on 1983’s Precious Time album.

This album is okay, however it seems more or less like a greatest hits collection thrown in with a few new tracks. But its a good live album overall from what sounds like one exciting tour. B+


The Wild Heart is quite possibly one that loves stuff from the late 70’s and 80’s. Why? Because it was a time when rock n’ roll was starting to become more accepting of women. That’s important to the Wild Heart because the Wild Heart is a WOMAN!Also, it brought about one of the best things to ever hit music initially (but has since become a bad promo tool) and that is none other than MTV.

Pat Benatar was an integral part of that. She, along with others like Fleetwood Mac‘s Stevie Nicks, the late Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane/Jefferson Starship’s Grace Slick, as well as Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart, would become the trailblazers for female rockers.  She showed women that it’s okay to be as tough as the boys. Just listen to the lyrics to songs like “Heartbreaker,” “Fight It Out,” “No You Don’t,” “You Better Run” and the ever-popular “Hit Me With Your Best Shot.” Get the point?

Benatar also showed us that classical musicians CAN become rockers. She was originally going to study opera at Juliard, but decided to not do so. The two worlds, in spite of their differences, are essentially the same if you look at them very closely. This is something I always try to tell a music teacher friend of mine. She has [in my opinion] a somewhat limited knowledge

Pat Benatar E-Reader Screensaver

Cherry Crimson

of rock music.

“I knew the sound wasn’t right.As I sat there, listening to the playback from my first-ever recording session, I knew that something was off. It wasn’t that the speakers were bad or the mics were low. It wasn’t that my voice sounded wrong or the drummer was off the beat. It was more subtle than all that, but also much worse — not something that could be fixed by a simple equipment change. The problem was that I sounded like Julie Andrews trying to sing hard rock.” – Pat Benatar on her first recording session (Between A Heart & A Rock Place)

Also, she had a pretty good eye for fashion. When it comes to music, unless you are the terrible Lady Gaga, you cannot go wrong with that.

We salute you!


Get Nervous

Image via Wikipedia

Pat Benatar is one of those artists that can be angry, sweet, and in this case, insane within one album: Get Nervous.

One of the greatest things about what Benatar does is that she sings from her gut. She does this well on Anxiety (Get Nervous). As a listener, you can feel the fear and trembling in the opening lines “I feel a little shaky, I can’t control my nerves/I know you think I’m freakin’, but can’t you feel the curves?/I swear to you this feeling it scares me half to death/It gathers in my throat and it gathers up my breath.” She also screams and cries her way through Fight It Out and Tell It To Her.

Benatar and husband-guitarist Neil Giraldo are also ones that know how to write an inspiring anthem.  Shadows of the Night is a clear follow-up to her signature hit Hit Me With Your Best Shot from her 1980 album Crimes of Passion. It is a song about running into the arms of love despite anything bad happening. However, Benatar and her band return to their classic music formula with Little Too Late, which is an amazing rock song. However that’s only a warm-up to creepily amazing I’ll Do It.

Get Nervous is essentially a concept album without actually being a concept album. In this case the concept is Pat Benatar goes insane. Insane about what? From possibly her 2010 autobiography it could be a metaphor for both her relationship with her then-record company, Chrysalis, and all of their demands. Concept albums aside, Get Nervous is a keeper!


When you have classical opera training behind your belt in rock music, you can’t lose. Pat Benatar is no exception to this rule with her release of Crimes of Passion.

Both Benatar and Giraldo kick the album off with a nice request for a man to treat a woman with dignity with the album-opener “Treat Me Right” – which is a stark contrast to her previous album opener: the hit single “Heartbreaker” on her first album In the Heat of the Night“Treat Me Right” is also a rather significant song in rock music history: it was the second music video that aired on the then-fledgling Mtv.

However, knowing Benatar’s trademark angry style, she kicks it into high-gear shortly after with the hit single “You Better Run” where she screams the chorus you better run/ you better hide/you better leave from my side. She continues this on the heavy-lyric-laden but guitar driven (no thanks to her husband Neal Giraldo) “Hell is for Children.” “Hell is for Children” is a song that speaks of the horrors of child abuse.

One nice change on this album is the fact that this time Benatar shows her soft side with such songs as the lushful rocker “Never Wanna Leave You” and her beautiful albeit with a rock touch cover of the Kate Bush classic “Wuthering Heights.”

Overall the album is a great album. B+