Posts Tagged ‘Fleetwood Mac’


Pat Benatar is one of the best artists to emerge from the MTV era of rock & roll: the 60s-90s. Among such heavyweights as Journey, the lovely ladies of Heart, Fleetwood Mac, and even the Buggles, Benatar holds her own with her powerhouse

Cover of "Live From Earth"

vocals. This what has made her an icon. However, as with all great artists, they are meant to be heard live. Benatar proves she’s worthy of this with her 1983 live album, Live From Earth.

However, with all great artists, they are meant to be heard live and Benatar proves that she’s worthy of the “must-see” concert label.

She opens the show with the haunting classic “Fire and Ice.” However, things get really amazing when she breaks into the gritty “I Want Out” followed by the awesomeness that is “We Live For Love” and the grisly, sad, and controversial “Hell Is For Children.” That track is literally one that leaps out of the speakers and grabs you instantly. Clearly, this is Pat Benatar at her “tough-girl” persona best. One which she would abandon for another persona, a bit more personal one if you will – motherhood, with her 1984 album Tropico. The two studio tracks, the ever-popular “Love Is A Battlefield” and “Lipstick Lies” (both containing very memorable videos – such as Benatar herself doing Michael Jackson-style dance sequences) serve as a great transition into this new era for Benatar.

What Pat Benatar live album would not be complete without her performing her swan song, “Hit Me With Your Best Shot?” None! However, this is probably the weaker track of this album because you can barely hear her vocals. Since the album was recorded in many places, wherever they recorded it, the acoustics are TERRIBLE!

Benatar and her husband Neil Geraldo quickly redeem themselves on “Promises In the Dark.” The live version of “Promises In The Dark” actually sounds better than the recording as heard on 1983’s Precious Time album.

This album is okay, however it seems more or less like a greatest hits collection thrown in with a few new tracks. But its a good live album overall from what sounds like one exciting tour. B+

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A friend of mine said once that Fleetwood Mac is a band of solo artists – or something like that. Currently, you have Stevie Nicks – the lead singer, In this case he is right on the money. His proof: the documentary Fleetwood Mac: Destiny Rules.

Destiny Rules is a candid documentary that follows the making of the band’s 2003 studio album Say You Will. It was the first album without longtime member and keyboardist Christine McVie and the first record with guitarist Lindsey Buckingham back in the band. Buckingham left the band shortly before the tour for their 1987 album Tango In the Night.

What Destiny Rules shows us is that, while a considerable amount of healing has taken place among the band – particularly between the notoriously stormy relationship between Buckingham and singer Stevie Nicks, there are still some caveats. For starters, they are somewhat worlds apart in their approaches to their craft – in particular the overall style.

For starters, Buckingham wanted their latest album to be a double album. A sordid Tusk 2.0 if you will. Nicks and the rest of the band see a double album as career suicide. She is right in her assessment that younger people, their target audience, will not buy a double album in 2003. After all, she would know because her solo efforts have, for the most part, consistently sold well despite her own age. Buckingham’s albums haven’t sold as well as hers.

To further drive home this point, when I saw Nicks in August 2011, her audience was a pretty full house. It consisted of young

English: FLEETWOOD MAC on March 3, 2009 in St....

women, families with children, some men and older women. It was at the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavillion in the Woodlands – just outside Houston, TX. When Lindsey Buckingham came to the Verizon Wireless Theater in downtown Houston, it was a smaller audience that consisted of older men and women. I and my friend Javier both joked that the audience was “the Woodstock generation” because we are in our mid-twenties.

But one of the best things is that it shows the actual production process that the album went through. Such as the scene where Stevie and Lindsey converse about Throw Down and the possibility of editing out a verse. Also the idea of choosing the right mixing person to mix the songs is shown.

However the biggest complaint with this DVD is that there are absolutely NO extras. It is bare bones. It says on the back that the documentary was culled from over 500 hours of footage. You mean to tell me that you couldn’t make some extras out of that?!

B+

 


Yes friends, Eddie Trunk of That Metal Show has officially won my respect. Why? Because he has repeatedly called out the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (or to him “The Rock and Roll Hall of Shame”) for not including such hard rock acts as Heart, Rush, Foreigner, Journey, Alice Cooper, in lieu of such acts as Donna Summer, various rap acts, etc.

I am in full agreeance with Trunk!  The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame leaves much to be desired. They consistently shun the real legends – the ones who have actually influenced others to be rock & rollers.

KISS

KISS, whether or not you love them, they are rather influential. They are very successful touring artists. They’ve been eligible since 1999 because their debut album was released in 1974.

Heart

Without the Wilson sisters, there would be no Seattle music scene, Alice in Chains and maybe even Nirvana. Virtually every woman who has picked up a guitar has in some way been influenced by Nancy Wilson; or for that matter any woman that wanted to sing Zepplin-style rock & roll with Ann’s powerhouse vocals. (Go listen to songs like Barracuda, White Lightning and Wine, How Can I Refuse and the ever-enduring Magic Man) Better yet, they, like KISS are still popular even with younger people today! I remember I went to their concert they performed with Journey (another deserving artist) and Cheap Trick back in 2008. I was expecting the crowd to be mostly people my parents age – in their 50’s. To my surprise, there were many people there my age as well as the age of my guest – I was 22 and a junior in college at the time. My guest was 19 and a freshman in college. They have been eligible ever since 2000.

Stevie Nicks

Though she already is a member of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as a member of Fleetwood Mac, she has never been inducted as a solo artist. She is technically eligible as a solo artist due to the fact that Bella Donna was released 30 years ago. Many artist such as Sheryl Crow (wh is a legend herself if you ask me) and Florence Welch of Florence + the Machine have all cited her as an influence.

Journey

Never has a band since Aerosmith seen such a surge in popularity than say, Journey. The main factor in the surge is none other than the usage of Don’t Stop Believingon MTV’s The Hills and other shows like Glee. They’ve been eligible since 2000.

Foreigner

Without Foreigner, there would be no Bon Jovi.  They’ve been eligible since 2002.

Read this article for more info.


The Wild Heart is quite possibly one that loves stuff from the late 70’s and 80’s. Why? Because it was a time when rock n’ roll was starting to become more accepting of women. That’s important to the Wild Heart because the Wild Heart is a WOMAN!Also, it brought about one of the best things to ever hit music initially (but has since become a bad promo tool) and that is none other than MTV.

Pat Benatar was an integral part of that. She, along with others like Fleetwood Mac‘s Stevie Nicks, the late Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane/Jefferson Starship’s Grace Slick, as well as Ann and Nancy Wilson of Heart, would become the trailblazers for female rockers.  She showed women that it’s okay to be as tough as the boys. Just listen to the lyrics to songs like “Heartbreaker,” “Fight It Out,” “No You Don’t,” “You Better Run” and the ever-popular “Hit Me With Your Best Shot.” Get the point?

Benatar also showed us that classical musicians CAN become rockers. She was originally going to study opera at Juliard, but decided to not do so. The two worlds, in spite of their differences, are essentially the same if you look at them very closely. This is something I always try to tell a music teacher friend of mine. She has [in my opinion] a somewhat limited knowledge

Pat Benatar E-Reader Screensaver

Cherry Crimson

of rock music.

“I knew the sound wasn’t right.As I sat there, listening to the playback from my first-ever recording session, I knew that something was off. It wasn’t that the speakers were bad or the mics were low. It wasn’t that my voice sounded wrong or the drummer was off the beat. It was more subtle than all that, but also much worse — not something that could be fixed by a simple equipment change. The problem was that I sounded like Julie Andrews trying to sing hard rock.” – Pat Benatar on her first recording session (Between A Heart & A Rock Place)

Also, she had a pretty good eye for fashion. When it comes to music, unless you are the terrible Lady Gaga, you cannot go wrong with that.

We salute you!


0:22-0:44 – Stevie, if you’re gonna hand deliver The Wild Heart to everyone then how come I had to pay $3 for it at the record store. (note: I wasn’t even born yet!)

3:27-3:54 – “Where am I again? This dance I’m trying to do…….was done bad.”

This is perhaps one of the best, albeit craziest, performances of Stand Back that exists.


For some reason, everytime I do Stevie Nicks my numbers go up! This is one I personally like myself.

the wildheart

Rock music’s gold dust woman makes a huge splash with her 1983 release, The Wild Heart.

Stevie Nicks is known for having a lush, deep, contra-alto voice. Nicks’ beautiful voice truly shines on such tracks as synthesizer-driven If Anyone Falls. The track only gets better on the chorus, when Nicks is joined by her two backup singers which include die-hard fan favorite band member Lori Perry- Nicks.

However, the best track on this album is the ever-popular Stand Back. Since the album’s release, it has become a staple at both Nicks’ solo shows and Fleetwood Mac concerts. It shows Nicks at her best – complete with vocal prowess.

Nicks also shows what a great songwriter she is on Nothing Ever Changes in which Nicks exclaims “Come back…little boy/ baby come back…yeah…little boy/ Ooh…it’s just me that lies waiting/ Well it could come from anywhere/ oooh it could…

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In the mid-80’s rocker Stevie Nicks was at the top of her game with her multiplatinum-selling albums (1981’s Bella Donna &  1983’s The Wild Heart). However, by 1986, her “game” was being threatened by a deadly cocaine habit which greatly affected her then-latest album, Rock A Little, and its subsequent tour. Her 1986 concert, Stevie Nicks: Live At Red Rocks chronicles her concert at the beautiful Red Rocks Ampitheater tucked away inside the Colorado Rocky Mountains in Denver.

While this dvd is far from Nicks’ worst performance, it’s not up to par with her post-drugs performances such as her 2009 dvd: Live in Chicago. Nevertheless, there are some redeemable parts of this concert. For example, she opens the show with the Bella Donna-era classic, Outside the Rain with a nice fade-into her Fleetwood Mac classic Dreams. 

However, one of the best parts of the concert is when she performs Talk To Me from 1985’s Rock A Little. Her vocals sound amazing just as they do on the album.

One of the cutest moments of the film is after Has Anyone Ever Written Anything For You. Someone in the audience releases a white-winged dove. The dove is then handed to Nicks (who tries to get the bird to speak into the mic) and she tries to release it, but the bird doesn’t leave.

Unfortunately Nicks’s performance of No Spoken Word is an absolute disaster in both sound and film. The closeups of her face are obviously retouched due to her drug issues. She looks tired. Additionally, her vocals sound tired. It gets even worse with Beauty and the Beast. On the ever-popular Edge of Seventeen, she performs a completely unnecessary vocal solo. At times, she even looks like she’s, as the great George Costanza once said on Seinfeld, in “a full-fledged body heave set to music.”

Overall, it’s an okay dvd due to the fact that it contains rarer songs that Nicks nowadays doesn’t perform live. However, it shows her in the worst part of her drug-fueled days. Fortunately after this tour she checked into rehab and has been off cocaine ever since.

B-.