Posts Tagged ‘Dreamboat Annie’


Cover of "Private Audition"

Heart is rock & roll’s most enduring band – there’s no doubt about it. However, even rock music’s most famous sisters have

their bad moments. 1982’s Private Audition is one of their moments.

Private Audition simply does not measure up to what we have come to love about Heart. Rather it seems like Heart has seen better days with their previous albums such as their classics: Dreamboat Annie, Dog & Butterfly and plenty more.

What makes Private Audition terrible is that it is, at times, an almost-total deviation of the style and essence that has made Heart legendary. In fact,l this deviation only works for them once and that is on This Man Is Mine. Furthermore, none of the songs showcase the powerhouse vocals of lead singer Ann Wilson, nor the mad guitar skills of her sister Nancy.

This is perhaps Heart’s worst album they have made. Thankfully most Heartmongers, including the Wilson sisters themselves, have all but forgotten this turkey of an album.  Soon after the album’s release, the sisters got rid of band members Steve Fossen and Mike DeRosier.

The verdict: buy any other album by Heart, but not this one.

 

 

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The Wild Heart not to long ago came across the National Recording Registry, which is a branch of the Library of Congress. I must say, it’s a pretty cool ordeal because it seeks to preserve both historical recordings and essentially recordings that defined what life was like at the time of their release. According to their website, these are the qualifications that the recording must meet:

“Recordings selected for the National Recording Registry are those that are culturally, historically or aesthetically important, and/or inform or reflect life in the United States.

For the purposes of recording selection, “sound recordings” are defined as works that result from the fixation of a series of musical, spoken, or other sounds, but not including the sound component of a moving image work, unless it is available as an autonomous sound recording or is the only extant component of the work.

Recordings may be a single item or group of related items; published or unpublished; and may contain music, non-music, spoken word, or broadcast sound. Recordings will not be considered for inclusion into the National Recording Registry if no copy of the recording exists.

No recording should be denied inclusion into the National Recording Registry because that recording has already been preserved.

No recording is eligible for inclusion into the National Recording Registry until ten years after the recording’s creation.”

While some of the recordings (rightfully so) belong into the Registry, however the Wild Heart thinks they forgot a few while in the process.

  1. The Concert for New York City – This recording became eligible a few weeks ago. However this was one of the things that brought the city of New York together like never before, but nevertheless after the tragedy of September 11, 2001.
  2. Woodstock: Three Days of Peace and Music – This recording has been eligible for at least 40 or more years. This festival defined what the 1960’s were all about.
  3. Woodstock 99 – If Woodstock 69 (mentioned above) was the embodiment of peace and music, Woodstock 99 was it’s evil twin. Take in mind the time of 1999: 2 of the major news events that happened were the impeachment of President William Jefferson Clinton over his affair with a White House intern named Monica Lewinsky and the school shooting at Columbine Highschool, which killed 15 people including the shooters themselves. There were also many copycat crimes as well. It was a rather violent time. Woodstock 99 was almost like a violent reaction to that time, however in the same violent vain.
  4. Dreamboat Annie by Heart – This was released at the peak of the second wave of the Women’s Liberation Movement. If anything, the fact that not one but two women head up this band. History was made with this album.
  5. 52nd Street by Billy Joel – If I ever want to know what life is like in the Big Apple, I just pop in one of his albums. This was, to me, what I picture Manhattan to be like at that time. Especially with such songs as Big Shot, Half A Mile Away, Zanzibar and the album’s title track.

In honor of Heart finally getting nominated to be in the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, I will be rerunning some of the reviews I have written in regards to the band this week. Enjoy!

In 1976, there were very few well-known women in hard rock. Enter two sisters named Ann and Nancy Wilson from Seattle, WA and their outlaw boyfriends Mike and Roger Fisher. When those women came across the border, magic and Dreamboat Annie was born!

Dreamboat Annie is the 1st album that was released by Heart. Normally with legendary bands, when they release their first album, it takes a bit of maturing on the part of the band to find their voice. Not so with Heart. Heart knows that the audience wants 100% unbridled creativity from their artists and that is exactly what shows on such songs as the hauntingly beautiful Magic Man where Wilson exclaims “‘come on home girl’ he said with a smile/ ‘you don’t have to love me and let’s get high awhile’/ ‘but try to understand’/ ‘try to understand’/ ‘try try try to understand I’m a magic man.'” On other tracks such as Crazy on You and Sing Child show that the Wilson sisters can rock with the best of their peers. They even get a bit raunchy like their male counterparts with White Lightning and Wine – a tribute to the effect that happens when you mix cocaine and booze.

However, the Wilsons are not all hard-rock, no ballad. There are plenty of beautiful ballads such as the three (count ’em), three different versions of Dreamboat Annie – all of which are amazing.

Unfortunately for Heart, their fortune was put in trouble with their own record company, Mushroom Records, decided to launch a poorly-done campaign resulting in a tabloid-style ad placed in such magazines as Rolling Stone that showed band leaders and sisters Ann and Nancy Wilson as sister lesbian lovers. The ad campaign showed the sisters from the shoulders up with the headline “it was only our first time.” This led to a host of legal problems involving both the band and Mushroom records – which went out of business in 1980.

Legal problems aside, the album itself is a great album. The Wilson sisters made history with this album and that is what makes it great.


It was a night with the sisterhood of the traveling guitars, a Gold Dust Woman, and a lady hailing from Port Arthur, TX Friday night at the Flamingo Room in Houston, TX with Spare Heart – a Tribute to Heart, Nightbird: Stevie NicksTribute, & Kozmic Pearl – a tribute to Janis Joplin.

Kozmic Pearl helped everyone step back in time with their interpretation of the best of late legend Janis Joplin.

Kozmic Pearl helped everyone step back in time with their interpretation of the best of late legend Janis Joplin., and opener Black Roze.

BlackRozeHouston kicked off the evening with a nice rendition of Your Love by the Outfield. However, that was nothing compared to the sultry vocals of the excellent Pat Benatar classic Invincible by Claudia Valenzuela. Their set was like a nice iPod playlist. They were a pretty good warmup for what was to come.

Spare Heart kicked off their set with a nice rendition of the 1978 hit Straight On from the Dog & Butterfly album. They even added a few bars to the song in a sort of jam-like session virtue, which gave the song a strong, welcome-to-the-show-like quality. However, the definitive showstopper was none other than Heart’s 1985 single Never in which bass player Sean Harrold brought the house down with his mad bass-playing skills.

In the style of the original Heart, Spare Heart changed the pace of the show with a slow, yet beautiful rendition of Love Alive. However, lead singer Linda Lambert kicks it back into high gear with Crazy On You and the ever-enchanting Magic Man. One of the more interesting things about their performance of Magic Man is that guitarist Staci Butler stays true to the Dreamboat Annie Live version rather than the actual recording of Dreamboat Annie.

However, what performance of a Heart tribute band would not be complete with a rousing performance of Heart’s most recognizable hit, Barracuda, which is the [literal] high note that Spare Heart used to close their set.

Kozmic Pearl was essentially like a little glimpse into what it may have been like to see the late legendary Janis Joplin with the Kozmic Blues Band in 1969 at Woodstock in . However, the highlight was when lead singer Myrna Sanders launched into a sultry rendition of Summertime and Cry Baby. According to one event attendee, Sanders was pretty close in her interpretation of Janis Joplin in both voice and even her bohemian-like style.

The main headliner was Nightbird – a Stevie Nicks tribute band. Lead vocalist Brooke Alyson portrays “Stevie Nicks” with much finesse as she launched into the ever-popular Stand Back – complete with twirls and sashays much like the real Stevie Nicks. One of the interesting things is that Alyson consistently takes cues from Nicks’ live shows – such as Nicks recent live show at the Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavillion.

One of the best things about Nightbird is that, like Stevie herself, Alyson adds quite extensively to the performance version of the songs – much like she did on the classic 1985 single Talk To Me. Alyson’s version sounds more like the Live At Red Rocks version rather than the actual recording. One of the best moments is when she semi-quietly sings the line though we lay face to face and cheek to cheek/ Our voices stray from the common ground where they could meet/ The walls run high, to veil a swelling tear” and then bursts into the rest of this beautiful song, giving it a majestic bang.

Nightbird pleases both new and dire-hard fans of Stevie Nicks

However one of the major surprises is that Alyson performed some of the deeper tracks of Nicks’ career such as songs from her latest album In Your Dreams where she did an a capella version of Moonlight (A Vampires Delight) as a lead-in to Sorcerer. Sorcerer is a Buckingham Nicks song  that was meant for (but didn’t make the final cut) of the album of the same title that was released prior to Nicks and then-boyfriend Lindsey Buckingham’s union with Fleetwood Mac.

Another major albeit nice surprise was the fact that keyboard player Kelli Thompson sang the Fleetwood Mac hit You Make Lovin’ Fun from 1977’s Rumours album as well as guitarist Adam Walton’s interpretation of I’m So Afraid.

It was a great night that celebrated the three most influential women in rock and roll.


Every single year, the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame releases its list of inductees. Every single year one band keeps getting snubbed. That band is Heart.

The Wild Heart thinks the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame is making a terrible mistake by not including the Wilson sisters.

Two of the make-or-break qualifications to get into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame are that you must be very influential and your 1st album must have been released 25 years ago.

Dreamboat Annie was released in 1976. That was over 30 years ago!

Without Heart, you would not have the Seattle music scene. No Nirvana,  Alice In Chains – whose late lead vocalist Layne Staley even recorded a cover duet of Bob Dylan’s Ring Them Bells for Heart’s 1993 album Desire Walks On. Members of Alice In Chains, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden and others have cited Ann and Nancy as influences on their music. Other current great artists such as Carrie Underwood, Wynonna Judd, and Gretchen Wilson have all cited Heart as influences. Some of these artists have recorded at their Bad Animals studio in Seattle, WA.

Heart was the first hard-rock female act. Many female acts have followed in their footsteps including Pat Benatar, Patti Smyth (of Scandal), Avril Lavigne and pretty much any other woman that has picked up a guitar since 1976. Rock music is no longer a boys club no thanks to them.

Lastly, they have enduring popularity. Since reuniting in the early 2000’s, they have sold rather well in both their albums and tours. Not many musicians with an absence like theirs from both radio and touring can say that they are successful after a long break like what they went through.


In 1976, there were very few well-known women in hard rock. Enter two sisters named Ann and Nancy Wilson from Seattle, WA and their outlaw boyfriends  Mike and Roger Fisher. When those women came across the border, magic and Dreamboat Annie was born!

Dreamboat Annie is the 1st album that was released by Heart. Normally with legendary bands, when they release their first album, it takes a bit of maturing on the part of the band to find their voice. Not so with Heart. Heart knows that the audience wants 100% unbridled creativity from their artists and that is exactly what shows on such songs as the hauntingly beautiful Magic Man where Wilson exclaims “‘come on home girl’ he said with a smile/ ‘you don’t have to love me and let’s get high awhile’/ ‘but try to understand’/ ‘try to understand’/ ‘try try try to understand I’m a magic man.'” On other tracks such as Crazy on You and Sing Child show that the Wilson sisters can rock with the best of their peers. They even get a bit raunchy like their male counterparts with White Lightning and Wine – a tribute to the effect that happens when you mix cocaine and booze.

However, the Wilsons are not all hard-rock, no ballad. There are plenty of beautiful ballads such as the three (count ’em), three different versions of Dreamboat Annie – all of which are amazing.

Unfortunately for Heart, their fortune was put in trouble with their own record company, Mushroom Records, decided to launch a poorly-done campaign resulting in a tabloid-style ad placed in such magazines as Rolling Stone that showed band leaders and sisters Ann and Nancy Wilson as sister lesbian lovers. The ad campaign showed the sisters from the shoulders up with the headline “it was only our first time.” This led to a host of legal problems involving both the band and Mushroom records – which went out of business in 1980.

Legal problems aside, the album itself is a great album. The Wilson sisters made history with this album and that is what makes it great.